Going Through The DCAU Part Seventeen

Remember when this came out once a week or so?

And we’re back with more cartoon superhero talk with Tom and Jimmy.

This week, we’re covering “Zatanna,” “The Mechanic,” and “Harley and Ivy”.

Continue reading Going Through The DCAU Part Seventeen

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Going Through The DCAU Part Sixteen

Remember when this came out once a week or so?

And we’re back with those wacky cartoon enthusiasts Tom and Jimmy for more of this feature.

This week, they’re covering the Batman the Animated Series episodes “The Man Who Killed Batman,” “Mudslide,” and “Paging the Crime Doctor”.

Continue reading Going Through The DCAU Part Sixteen

Going Through The DCAU Part Fourteen

Remember when this came out once a week or so?
Yes…it’s back.

FINALLY continuing Jimmy and Tom’s trip through the DCAU.

Today’s entry is on the Batman The Animated Series episodes “Terror in the Sky,” “Almost Got ‘Im,” and “Birds of a Feather”.

Continue reading Going Through The DCAU Part Fourteen

Slightly Misplaced Comic Book Heroes Case Files #29: Ragman

Shouting out a serious crime will, of course, not create more witnesses. Some murderers are dumb.
Shouting out a serious crime will, of course, not create more witnesses. Some murderers are dumb.

DC Comics loves a good legacy hero.  What better way to explain how the same superhero name has been used by different people?  Names are passed along like Grandma’s most worthless paperweight that no one really wants and no one is willing to throw away either.  And while some hero names are famous for this, with many Flashes and Green Lanterns, even obscure heroes are sometimes legacy heroes.

That would be where Ragman comes into play.

Continue reading Slightly Misplaced Comic Book Heroes Case Files #29: Ragman

Batman May Not Be The Tattoo You Want, But It’s The Tattoo You Need.

batman-tattoo-upgrade

Now – THIS is how you fix a bad tattoo. That’s right – Batman to fix Batman. There is no other way.

(via Reddit)

Tom Recommends: Starman Volume 2

Gabbing Geek Tom Recommends v2The Legacy Hero is a longstanding DC tradition.  The idea is to take an old character name and concept and rework the character into a new character who may or may not be related to the older one.  There’s a bit less of that with the “new 52” today, but when someone opted to rework the Flash from Golden Age Jay Garrick to Silver Age Barry Allen, everything went from there.  Furthermore, when Barry met Jay, a character most of Barry’s readers would have never heard of given their age and the collectability of old comics back then, the idea of connecting these old heroes took root and hasn’t really gone anywhere since.

One of the more prolific superhero names for DC has been Starman.  Originally, Starman was Ted Knight, an astrophysicist who discovered a way to channel starlight into a small wand he called a cosmic rod (stop giggling, Watson) that allowed him to fly and do stuff with stellar energy (mostly fire energy blasts).   Starman was, like many of his contemporaries, a member of the Justice Society and disappeared when the Golden Age of comics ended.  Unlike many of his contemporaries, the various attempts to create other Starman characters wasn’t as cut-and-dried as, say, Flash or Green Lantern.  There were many Starmen, all with different abilities and few with any relationship whatsoever to Ted Knight.

Post Zero Hour, DC produced another new Starman, this one the son of Ted Knight.  Jack Knight had no desire to be a superhero.  He was into collectables and ran a small knick-knack shop out of his home town of Opal City.  Circumstances pushed him into superheroing, and he probably became the single most memorable Starman of them all.

Continue reading Tom Recommends: Starman Volume 2

Slightly Misplaced Comic Book Case Files #25: X

"I hope you didn't need that window!"
“I hope you didn’t need that window!”

Last week I covered Night Man, a hero from the now defunct Malibu Comics’ Ultraverse line.  Malibu was hardly the only comic publisher to try out a superhero line in the mid 90s.  Dark Horse got involved with something they called “Comics Greatest World”.  At a time when a single issue would cost somewhere in the neighborhood of $2.25, Dark Horse offered weekly introductory comics for $1.  Each week for four months, there would be a new issue continuing the storyline in one of four fictional cities, namely Arcadia, Golden City, Steel Harbor, and Cinnibar Flats.  The last of those locations was where a mysterious Vortex had opened up after an alien scientist was caught doing advanced experiments in a place that humans were conducting simultaneous atomic bomb tests (oops).  The Vortex caused weird mutations and eventually superpowers for select individuals.  Now, granted, these $1 comics tended to be shorter than most comics, and when the regular line started for some of the featured characters, the prices went up, but as an introductory offer it was a good idea.

At any rate, each city had its own feel and distinctive characters.  Golden City, run by the superhuman Grace, the most powerful human hero on Earth (and a woman, Jenny), was a veritable utopia of advanced science.  Steel Harbor was a down-on-its luck blue color city with an industrial feel.  Its best known resident was a woman named Barb Wire that appeared in a movie played by Pamela Anderson.  Cinnibar Flats had sci-fi weirdness going on.  And Arcadia, the first city featured, was a festering cesspool of corruption on every level.  This place made Gotham City look like Disneyworld.

That was where the man called X decided to call the shots.

Continue reading Slightly Misplaced Comic Book Case Files #25: X

Awesome Cosplay Of The Day: Steampunk Poison Ivy

monster_plant_by_rei_doll-d82a5j5

I’ve seen a lot of different renditions of Poison Ivy by cosplayers, but nothing as cool as this. The Steampunk twist really makes this Gotham Villain something straight out of a mad-scientist comic book. Click after the break for more stunning photos.

Continue reading Awesome Cosplay Of The Day: Steampunk Poison Ivy